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A MANUSCRIPT IN THE MAKING

I'm writing a book.

A computer on a table on a terrace with a view in Tuscany


I know I said the same thing in my last post six months ago, but - rather annoyingly- that's still what I do.

It takes an infuriating amount of time to get all these words onto the screen. And once the words are on there, they start, just like my kids, to behave unruly and look badly spelt (spelled?), and it takes another infuriating (used same word already above) amount of time (synonym for time?) to tease them into a an attractive form and lovely singsong that hopefully - one day not too far - you people may want to read.

On a less artistic level I also spend a lot of time running after the pages of the manuscript, which, once gone with the wind, tend to get chewed up by our neighbour's sheep. That's one more reason why the Map It Out Tuscany, Siena and Montalcino blogs have turned into a sort of wasteland lately. Luckily, I planted a few sturdy succulents long ago, which keep this blog alive even though wasn't around here much already during the year before starting work on the manuscript. I was far too busy then with living through the story the book will tell - a story that focuses on the daily ups and downs of the workings of a refugee home in a Tuscan hilltop town and my experience in the midst of it.  

Migration and the so called 'refugee crisis' and the impact of the two on a small village and an improvised shelter in the Tuscan hinterland are the main topics of the book. If complicated (intricate?) matters like these speak to you, bear with me. I'm going to publish The Trouble with Helping (working title) in English in autumn 2016, and further down the lane also in Italian and German.

Drop me an email, if you'd like to be informed once the The Trouble with Helping is ready to roll. Just write 'book news' or something similar in the header and I'll add you to the mailing list. I know there are clever apps out there that would make it easier for you to sign up to my book list, but I haven't had the nerves yet to figure them out. Because - as I said - I'm sitting here typing away. 

UPDATE WINTER 2017: 'Across the Big Blue Sea: Good Intentions and Hard Lessons in an Italian Refugee Home' will be published in February 2017. More info on the book website: www.acrossthebigbluesea.com

A dog, a cat and a table with a Tuscan view
If only they could write it for me.

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